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Centre for Child Protection

Projects

Child sexual abuse – Rosie 1 (prototype)

Project team: Professor Jane Reeves, Professor David Shemmings

Neglect

Rosie 2 was developed with various contributions

Project team: Professor Jane Reeves and Professor David Shemmings, Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent, with contributions from Mary Smith, Lecturer in Social Work, University of Kent, Nicky Shaw, Training and Development Manager, Kent County Council and Stephanie Pell, Social Worker, Swanley and Sevenoaks Duty and Initial Assessment Team.

Courtroom Skills

My Courtroom was developed with Cafcass (Children and Family court Advisory and Support Service)

Project team: Professor Jane Reeves, Professor David Shemmings and Dr Tracee Green, Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent, Helen Abbotts and Lynne Marsden, Cafcass

Gangs, knife crime and county lines

Project team: Professor Jane Reeves and Emma Soutar, Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent, with thanks to Professor Alex Stevens University of Kent, Shuna Body MBE, Dr Tara Young, University of Kent, Sharon Macaulay, Kent and Medway VRU, David Clark, The Swale Academy Trust, Kim Allmark, DACT, NHS England and Emma Brace, Barts Health NHS Trust.

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

Looking out for Lottie was developed with NHS Kent, Surrey and Sussex and updated in collaboration with the NSPCC

Project team: Professor Jane Reeves, Professor David Shemmings and Dr Emily Blake, University of Kent, with special thanks to Kent Police, KCC and NHS KSS.

2018 revisions by NSPCC, Professor Jane Reeves and Emma Soutar, Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent.

Radicalisation and extremism on right wing and religious extremism

Behind Closed Doors was funded by the Home Office

Project team: Professor Jane Reeves, Dr Tracy Crowther, Almagir Sheriyar, and Sally Green, Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent.

Radicalisation and online grooming

Project team Zak at University: Centre for Child Protection, Kent Police Special Branch; including Almagir Sheriyar and Nick Wilkinson and Kent County Council.

Project team Zak the Gamer: Centre for Child Protection, including Sally Green.

Managing sex offenders

Visiting Elliot was developed in collaboration with Kent Police, Kent Probation Service and Kent County Council.

Project team: Professor Jane Reeves and Dr Emily Blake, Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent

RITA – Responsive InTeractive Advocate

The University of Kent led and project managed this exciting ground-breaking project to support the UK’s ageing population through the use of responsive and interactive avatars.

Project team: Prof Jane Reeves, Co-Director of the Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent, Dr Wendy Powell, Senior Lecturer in applications of virtual reality, University of Portsmouth (School of Creative Technologies, Portsmouth), Dr Valerie Carr, Creative Director/Senior Service Designer, WeAreSnook, Dr Blair Dickson, Director and Head of Applied Neuroscience, Affective State.

Preventing the online child sexual exploitation and abuse (OCSEA) of children in Thailand and Cambodia

This is an ongoing project following a grant from the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children (End Violence Partnership).

Project Partners: Centre for Child Protection, University of Kent, ECPAT International, A21 (Thailand), Playerthree and the University of Stirling.

Family on the Move

This free, e-learning module is part of a wider Erasmus+ funded project in which colleagues from the University of Tirana, New Bulgaria University, University of Prishtina, University of Bucharest, University of Belgrade, State Pedagogical University of Chisinau, in partnership with Terre des hommes and the Universities of Kent and Stirling (UK), collaboratively developed child protection modules for qualifying social work programmes in each of the partner countries.

Department of Education – Exploring how technology can support traumatised young people in care to recognise, communicate and cope with strong emotions and manage their behaviour more effectively

This project, funded by the Department for Education (DfE)’s Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme, looked at how young people in care aged between 12 and 18 use technology and how technology may support them with the additional issues they face as they navigate through adolescence and their care journey to independence and adulthood.  The University of Kent, University of Portsmouth, ‘Snook’ and ‘Affective State’ (SME’s) was given a substantial grant to investigate if and how traumatised young people in care and their carers would want to use technology to keep them safe.